Current Founded Projects

Projects

Current Funded Projects

Chlorpromazine loading and irradiation into hydrogels by UV laser radiation, as alternative to bacterial infected wound treatment
Project code:
PN-III-P1-1.1-PD-2019-1117
Project number:
PD 125/2020
Funding bodies:
MCI, UEFISCDI
Programme:
Postdoctoral Research Project
Coordinator:
National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics (INFLPR)
Project Leader:
Dr. Tatiana Tozar
Start date:
01.09.2020
End date:
31.08.2022

The number of drug-resistant bacteria is currently growing up, and the possibilities for successful treatment are narrow due to the lack of solutions in eradicating them. To overcome the emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria it is necessary to identify new approaches in using the existing drugs and to find ‘smart’ drug delivery systems.

The discovery of compounds with direct antimicrobial effects obtained by laser irradiation of a drug is a further step in filling the gap created in antimicrobial research and represents a new approach in chemistry, biology, and pharmacology. In this respect, irradiated chlorpromazine (CPZ) proved to be an antimicrobial agent against resistant bacteria. More, conventional drug delivery methods are overwhelmed by repeated dosage of drugs and their systemic toxicity. An alternative is hydrogels that offer optimized therapeutic action of the drug and minimize the disadvantages of classical delivery method.

This proposal is addressing the use of UV laser radiation for exposure of a mixture of polymer-CPZ to form hydrogels with already irradiated CPZ in it, thus eliminating the process of CPZ separate irradiation and loading. This kind of hydrogels may be applied in wound dressing for patients that show infected wounds with various bacterial pathogens resistant to antibiotics.

The project has an interdisciplinary nature, combining antimicrobial and laser spectroscopy research. It aims to provide new data on physics, chemistry, and biology of hydrogel formation and loading with drug solutions. The project’s results may have an important impact in future extensive use of laser modified compounds in medicine, pharmacology and patient care.

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